Cameron Fuller Archive

Have you read OpsMgr 2007 R2 Unleashed?

Normally I would not ask this question, but a recent comment on Amazon brought this question to mind and it just won’t leave until I finish writing this. I am looking for feedback and your thoughts on the System Center Operations Manager 2007 R2 Unleashed book. We have had two comments on the book so far on Amazon (and some great feedback on the blogs including the review from Marnix Wolf, and threads in the forums – thank you!). As a reminder and for background, this book was a big shift as we moved to what I term a “Community

SystemCenterCentral Management Pack Contest & the Scheduled Resolution Update Management Pack

As part of the SystemCenterCentral management pack contest (details available here), there are now 10 different management packs which have already been submitted which perform a variety of functions. Currently these include: Maintenance Mode History Report Management pack  HP EVA Management Pack V2 Top Processes Identifier Management Pack for Operations Manager 2007 and Essentials 2010 System Up Time Monitoring Event Rules with Flooding Prevention SQL Server DB Mirroring Management Pack Windows Admin Tasks Management Pack Windows 2008 Active Directory Change Audit Beta 1 (for SCE 2010 and OpsMgr 2007 R2) SQL Admin Extensions Sample Management Pack for OpsMgr 2007 and

IT Consulting: Not a series of sprints… a marathon (#ITConsulting)

In the late 90’s, my family and I had planned a trip to Michigan to take a week to relax and to spend time at the lake with my relatives. I was working as an IT Director for my dotcom and we were still in the phase of getting things really rolling. This was my first chance to step away for a bit from the stress of work and relax. We had our flights booked, and shortly prior to our leaving for the trip my cell phone rang. It was the president of our company and he was calling to

QuickTricks: What OpsMgr management pack was a group stored in?

A colleague of mine asked me a question which sounded like a breeze but either I missed the easy solution (if you know of one please post a comment to this blog entry). However I came up with a total of three ways to determine what management pack a group was created in: 1) For a one-off group you can get this information by opening the group in the authoring pane, and then going to create an override – the override location will default to the same MP. 2) Open the monitoring pane, Discovered Inventory, change target type, select View

System Center Virtual User Group – Presentation download links

The download links for each of the sessions from the last System Center Virtual User group are now available at: All sessions:^311 Links to each individual session: Andy Dominey: NightWatchman Server Edition 2.0 Cameron Fuller: OpsMgr 2007 How to create and use custom groups Kevin Holman: Management group checkup – a database perspective Tony LaMark: System Center Operations Manager to monitor a VMWare environment with VMWare vCenter All virtual user group presentations:

OpsMgr scheduled reports work but no graphics?

I was working on scheduled report delivery by SQL Reporting Services in 2008 within Operations Manager 2007 R2 but when they showed up the charts in the attachment were blank. NOTE: If you are going to email enable the report you need to configure the E-Mail settings in the Reporting Services Configuration Manager or the option to email will not appear when you attempt to schedule a report for delivery. I tried multiple formats (Adobe, Word, HTML) but each was missing the graphics. I found the KB article on this ( but these reports were still delivering without the graphics.

URL’s from System Center Virtual User Group meeting today

Thanks to everyone who attended the Virtual User Group today! The following are the URL’s referenced in my presentation today on how to create and use custom groups in OpsMgr: – Getting-the-red-out!3D3B8489FCAA9B51!1940.entry – Creating custom groups (Name, OU, AD site)!3D3B8489FCAA9B51!1969.entry – Using custom groups to create views!3D3B8489FCAA9B51!2035.entry?wa=wsignin1.0&sa=90489102 – Using Custom Groups to secure Views!3D3B8489FCAA9B51!2017.entry – Creating custom views – Real-world notifications – Notification via groups and classes – Granular alert notifications – Notifying on a keyword – Notification scenarios – Alert Severity and Priority – Dynamic groups that

I (used to) write ugly management packs

AKA Recreating the ReSearch This! Management Pack – By Example During MMS 2010 I was involved in a discussion where I mentioned that you don’t have to be a coder to write management packs. The ReSearch This! management pack was the example that I was citing as it’s a really simple management pack which just provides a way to interact with a community driven alert repository. It was written in the Operations Manager console, and just exported to use. A good friend of mine however pointed out that if I really want to make this a management pack I really

Performance Analysis of Logs (PAL) Tool

My colleague JC Warner pointed this out to me a while ago and I’ve been meaning to blog on it. The Performance Analysis of Logs (PAL) Tool takes Performance Log files and analyzes it against user defined thresholds to produce HTML files with graphs that are easy to distribute. The utility gives a PerfMon template that you can load onto server to capture the statistics that you have identified. It works with a captured data set which is unlike OpsMgr but it may well be useful in organizations – especially those that do not have Operations Manager. This utility can

Re-targeting rules in the OpsMgr Authoring console (or how the Authoring console saved my ….)

I recently was working on a way to translate rules from MOM 2005 to OpsMgr 2007 without using the backward compatibility management pack. While the concept worked out well, I made a mistake in how I targeted these new rules. What I started seeing was that OpsMgr was generating alerts which were displaying an incorrect source. So that I had several rules which whenever they occurred they were reporting the same alert 6-10 times from different sources. What I found out was that I had made a mistake on these rules and had targeted them to Windows Local Application instead